Page 10 of 11 FirstFirst ... 34567891011 LastLast
Results 136 to 150 of 165

Thread: For more speed, add lightness

LIKE THIS THREAD!

  1. #136
    3,000 rpm - starting to feel the power freedomgli's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 Miata
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    976
    Thanks Given
    169
    Thanked 836 Times in 335 Posts
    Here is a graph of my noisy TPS w/ averaging lag factor at 30. Will run new ground wire directly from TPS to ECU sensor ground wire. Once I do that I will change lag factor back to 85 or so.


    Here is a graph of my CLT/MAT/BattV/Baro w/ lag factor at 30. Only Baro seems to be noisy. It fluctuates +/- 0.3kpa (0.6kpa total) which I suppose isn't all that bad but still would prefer it be more stable. CLT, MAT and BattV seem fine to me.
    Last edited by freedomgli; 01-24-2017 at 09:29 PM.

  2. #137
    2,000 rpm - light wheelspin, no bog here! mrpham's Avatar
    Drives
    Crystal White MX-5
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    255
    Thanks Given
    1
    Thanked 179 Times in 60 Posts
    If grounding doesn't work, shielded microphone cable works well. I used it for tps, cam and crank. Grounding only at ecu.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to mrpham For This Useful Post:

    freedomgli (01-24-2017)

  4. #138
    3,000 rpm - starting to feel the power freedomgli's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 Miata
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    976
    Thanks Given
    169
    Thanked 836 Times in 335 Posts

    Unboxing my new Rogue Engineering steering wheel quick release adapter


    Here it is in all it's glory. Should make it easier to sit in the driver's seat with the laptop computer open when tuning the car in my driveway or on the dyno. Will also make it easier to get in/out when I temporarily fit race seats for track days.


    You can rotate the release paddle to any position you want. The little dimple serves as an index mark, which I located at the 12 o'clock position. This puts the release button, which serves as a safety mechanism to prevent accidental release, at the 11 o'clock position where it is easy to see and depress.


    Hub side


    It comes with instructions that aren't in English, an allen wrench for the supplied bolts that affix the adapter to your existing steering wheel hub, some crappy electrical wires to make your horn button work and two grounding rings. Why two? I'm not certain because I cannot read the instructions. I tried using a translation app on my phone but it gave terrible English translations from both Simplified Chinese and Japanese. I think two grounding rings may be needed if your steering column itself is not grounded and you need a dedicated ground wire from your existing steering wheel hub to a chassis ground.

    In my case, the factory steering column is grounded and my Daikei hub adapter is all metal construction so it, too, is grounded. I ended up using just one grounding ring between the quick release and my Daikei hub. I bent the end of the little tab 90ฐ so that it was pointing backwards towards the inside of the Daikei hub where there is more room for wires to reside. Then I connected the grounding ring to the correct male spade terminal on the hub side of the RE quick release adapter (more on this later). Unfortunately, the supplied female spade quick connects were too wide to securely fit the ground tab on the grounding ring so I had to redo that myself. Most of the supplied wires had improperly crimped terminals resulting in immediately failure just pulling on them gently. Basically, plan to use your own not sucky horn wiring.


    Hub side installed. Those two little contacts in the center are what allow the power and ground circuits to reach the horn button when the steering wheel is connected. The +/- was mislabeled between the two halves of the RE quick release adapter, so be sure to check your wiring before you attach the steering wheel to avoid a constant blaring horn. Good thing I noticed this myself or my wife would have killed me for waking up our sleeping baby.


    I had to solder the horn wires as the supplied insulated female spade quick connects do not fit inside the cavity where the horn button resides when using a small Momo horn button. Maybe they work with the large Momo horn button that rests on top of the steering wheel? After I snapped this pic I redid the solder joints to rotate each wire 90ฐ outward for better clearance and so the extra length would wrap nicely inside. I also had to bend the contacts down a bit. The horn button is almost flush but needs a slight tweak to be absolutely 100% perfect.


    Here is the same wires but soldered to the horn button. The black wire is connected to the ground terminal, which is denoted by the little earth ground symbol. I always insert the wire through the hole and then loop it 180ฐ backwards into a hook shape to give the joint greater mechanical strength as the solder alone isn't very strong.


    Installed.


    This quick release hub is automatically indexing, which means no matter what orientation you install the steering wheel it will only lock into place when the correct alignment has been achieved. Once attached, there is absolutely no free play. It feels solid.

    Other than the crappy instructions and the cheap wiring, my first impressions are that this is a pretty decent unit. It's basically a NRG 2.5, which is itself a ripoff of the Works Bell Rapfix II. I was hoping that being a private label affair, RE would have done a little more due diligence to make sure theirs avoided the mistakes of the NRG units (see Adam's excellent Quick Release Shootout at http://revlimiter.net/blog/2016/04/q...review-1/#nrg1 for more detail). Even so, the price is generally inline with the NRG version and I think it looks a little better as I'm not into flashy colors and I think the RE release paddle shape is a bit more subdued. Overall, not bad for $132.34 shipped, especially considering most parts marketed to BMW owners come at a premium price.

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to freedomgli For This Useful Post:

    Dave737 (02-15-2017),MikeA (02-14-2017),NCGreasemonkey (02-14-2017)

  6. #139
    3,000 rpm - starting to feel the power freedomgli's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 Miata
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    976
    Thanks Given
    169
    Thanked 836 Times in 335 Posts
    Here are the instructions in case someone wants to take a crack at translating into English or if the pictures might help anyone else


  7. The Following User Says Thank You to freedomgli For This Useful Post:

    NCGreasemonkey (02-16-2017)

  8. #140
    3,000 rpm - starting to feel the power freedomgli's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 Miata
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    976
    Thanks Given
    169
    Thanked 836 Times in 335 Posts




    Check out my new "Forever Door Panels" by Primer 3d aka vortexblue aka Chris. He's a super cool old school air-cooled VW dude who used to work for Sector 111 building incredible Ariel Atoms and BAC Monos. Now he has his own business offering prototyping, 3d scanning, 3d printing and computer modeling services. He's also doing these laser cut ABS plastic "Forever" door panels, which you can get from Goodwin Racing or at his stores on eBay and etsy. The nice thing about them is they'll never warp like the OEM hard board. I always like to upgrade when given the opportunity, like when I used the "Unbreakable" PVC rain rail on my soft top to replace the brittle OEM plastic one.

    You can buy the raw door panels and upholster them yourself or you contact him directly to discuss custom upholstery options. If you own a 93LE, you're in luck, as he has the red vinyl to redo your door panels. He also has some neat German basketweave vinyl for that Singer 911 vibe. I went with the plain black vinyl as my interior theme is subdued OEM+. These new door panels will eventually go on my car with new window bushings and tracks, vapor barriers, Acme Auto Headlining Co. door top rails, panel fasteners, window cranks and RM door pull fasteners with M2-1028 nylon pull straps.


    In other news, I spent all day Saturday stripping a wiring harness from a junkyard Honda Pilot to get some quality OEM wire and then running a new TPS ground wire from my sensor to my ECU analog sensor ground. I didn't want to drill any new holes in my firewall and there wasn't enough room to run it through the same hole as my vacuum reference hose. So I did what many others have done and just poked a tiny hole in the large rubber boot that seals the hole where the vast majority of OEM wires pass through the firewall to the ECU. It's not pretty but it gets the job done. One day I'd love to shave the engine bay and do a custom wire tuck and motorsports harness with high end connectors. But for now I just want the car to run!

    Unfortunately, the wiring change did not result in a significant improvement in the level of TPS noise. So my choices now are either to live with it (and a TPS averaging lag factor of 30) or completely rewire the TPS using shielded wire. If I rewire then I will probably just get rid of the vacuum line I'm not using now (it was a major pain to run through the firewall and I was saving it for a potential switch to ITB Load Mode down the road) and just run the shielded wire through there and make the necessary changes on the ECU connector. Does anyone know how to de-pin wires at the OEM ECU connector?

    Also, the Auto-zero TPS function doesn't seem to work for me as I still get occasional negative TPS values if I calibrate the sensor normally. So instead I have to manually overshoot the "Closed throttle ADC count” so I don't go negative as the ECU doesn't know what to do with negative TPS values.

  9. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to freedomgli For This Useful Post:

    Dandy (02-21-2017),Greasemonkey2000 (02-21-2017),MikeA (02-24-2017),oldgrayleather (04-01-2017)

  10. #141
    3,000 rpm - starting to feel the power freedomgli's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 Miata
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    976
    Thanks Given
    169
    Thanked 836 Times in 335 Posts
    We took the Miata out for its first drive under its own power since October 2014!



    Finally got a chance to do some street tuning of the Miata with my dad behind the wheel and me in the passenger seat focused on the laptop computer. We started off slow just in the neighborhood and as we gained more confidence we ventured further away. Filled up with fresh 93 octane fuel. Did some auto tuning and tried to hit as many throttle position / rpm bins as we could, riding the brake to simulate loads when necessary.





    Coolant temps were stable around 200F the whole time, with brief spikes to 215F immediately after a hot restart (when we filled up gas) and during a few wide open throttle runs, which seems reasonable. But my intake air temps (MAT) were much higher than desired, especially given it was a cool day (50F). I think this is due to the coolant return hard pipe that is routed right underneath my velocity stacks. I'll need to insulate this bare aluminum pipe with some fire sleeve and possibly fabricate a splash shield to go between the pipe and the air filter and insulate it with some of that gold foil stuff. I've got some ideas....

    I'd say the tune is about 25% of the way there. I have some pesky sync loss errors that need to be addressed before I feel confident enough to spend the $ to book the dyno time to really get this thing dialed in. Not really sure where to begin fixing those, but I might just start by throwing new cam and crank angle sensors at it. I'm think I'm also going to revert to MS3 1.4.1 firmware as the developers of 1.5.0 paid no mind to Alpha-N users when they added the new "engine states" feature that uses different logic than before to determine when the engine is in overrun. Because I have no MAP sensor connected to my engine I have disabled the Overrun Fuel Cut feature for now.

    We definitely need some acceleration enrichment to address the poor drivability immediately off idle. With ITBs, at very small throttle openings, very small changes in throttle position results in very large changes in the amount of air entering the motor. This can only be overcome with acceleration enrichment. The manual recommends tuning AE only once the main VE table is dialed in, but in this case I don't think I have much choice. I'll have to add some AE to address that one area and then retune. It's all iterative. Same thing with my after start enrichment (ASE) % and taper and warm up enrichment (WUE) settings. To get started I did what I had to do to keep the car running until it was up to operating temperature. But now that we've changed so many parameters on the VE1 table I need to go back and spend more time dialing in those settings.

  11. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to freedomgli For This Useful Post:

    Greasemonkey2000 (03-31-2017),HarryB (03-14-2017),MLambert19 (03-14-2017),NCGreasemonkey (03-14-2017),oldgrayleather (04-01-2017),Slampen (03-15-2017),Vegard (04-01-2017)

  12. #142
    3,000 rpm - starting to feel the power freedomgli's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 Miata
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    976
    Thanks Given
    169
    Thanked 836 Times in 335 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by freedomgli View Post
    But my intake air temps (MAT) were much higher than desired, especially given it was a cool day (50F). I think this is due to the coolant return hard pipe that is routed right underneath my velocity stacks. I'll need to insulate this bare aluminum pipe with some fire sleeve and possibly fabricate a splash shield to go between the pipe and the air filter and insulate it with some of that gold foil stuff. I've got some ideas....


    I installed Heatshield Products Fire Shield Sleeve p/n 210048 (1.25" ID x 3') on the aluminum coolant return hard pipe. According to the manufacturer:

    Heatshield Products Fire Shield Sleeve™ provides thermal and physical protection against excessive heat with its rugged silicone covering.This fuel line heat shield tubing starts with braided fiberglass yarns in a flexible substrate, then is coated with a high-grade silicone rubber. This rugged silicone coating makes the Fire Shield Sleeve™ resistant to most chemicals, including hydraulic fluids, oils and fuels. The coating also makes it resistant to abrasion and fraying. You can use Fire Shield Sleeve™ for brake lines, fuel lines, wiring harnesses and cables, making master rolls a must-have for any hot rod and race car shop. The rugged silicone coating also makes Fire Shield Sleeve™ ideal for protecting welding lines and cables. This oil line heat sleeve is designed to reduce and dissipate heat, and works great in harsh environments that require thermal protection and insulation. This heat sleeve fuel line withstands 500 degrees F continuous and brief intervals of 900 degrees F, and allows for the bundling of wires, hoses and cables.
    So while it's meant primarily to protect fuel lines and such, insulation works in both directions (think of your cooler or thermos), so I'm hoping this insulation helps keep my intake air temps down when coolant temps go up. If not, I'll have to ditch the open element air filter and go to a custom carbon fiber cold air box sooner rather than later.

    I secured the insulation to the hard pipe with the supplied heat shrink at the forward end, but I did not heat shrink the the other end as packaging was too tight in the back of the engine compartment and I didn't want to use my heat gun in confined space. Perhaps it would have looked cleaner if I'd butted the insulation right up against the silicone radiator hose and applied the heat shrink around both to seal the joint, but then it would not have been serviceable. I secured the coolant return hard pipe to my custom steel bracket with rubber isolated mount (basically a fat grommet) using a new 35mm 1.375" rubber insulated p-clamp to fit over the new larger OD.



    The whole thing looks a little kludged together but it really does give me more certainty in where and how the coolant return is routed. It's a real PITA to use the M-tuned supplied rubber hose (or Gates #22436 hose or Dayco #E72380 hose) with internal coil spring, especially when you don't have the stock intake manifold anymore to secure it to with zip ties. If I was to do this all over again, I'd probably weld AN fittings onto the M-tuned adapter and my radiator to completely eliminate rubber hoses and hose clamps in that section. But I'd still use the hard pipe in the middle for more precise packaging. I'd also probably change the geometry somewhat, moving it closer to the engine with tighter routing between the ITBs and the alternator. This wasn't possible when I first designed this as the car was 400 miles away and the ITBs weren't yet fully installed with all fuel lines, vacuum hoses, etc. so we had to make some educated guesses.

    Next I have to top off the coolant, burp the system and work on capturing a composite log of my many sync loss errors so I can come up with a plan to resolve those.

  13. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to freedomgli For This Useful Post:

    Greasemonkey2000 (03-31-2017),JamieH (04-01-2017),oldgrayleather (04-01-2017)

  14. #143
    6,000 rpm - mere mortals would shift Greasemonkey2000's Avatar
    Drives
    2001 NB2 aka Misfire
    Location
    Temple, Tx is where Chad resides.
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    4,118
    Thanks Given
    2,678
    Thanked 1,447 Times in 745 Posts
    Really great work Kyle! Such fantastic work and wonderful roadster!

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Greasemonkey2000 For This Useful Post:

    freedomgli (04-01-2017)

  16. #144
    3,000 rpm - starting to feel the power freedomgli's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 Miata
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    976
    Thanks Given
    169
    Thanked 836 Times in 335 Posts
    So let's start with the good news. I insulated my coolant return hard pipe and it appears to have done the trick. While I haven't tested it under load, I did a cold start and let it idle until engine was warm. CLT went from 66F to 180F and MAT went from 62F to 66F. Much better than before!



    The bad news is I still haven't figured out the cause of my random sync loss errors. I captured a data log of the warm up cycle and it showed 3 sync losses for reason #2 (missing tooth at wrong time). After it was warmed up I did a composite log.



    From my observations, the sync loss at the very beginning is the normal sync loss everyone experiences during the first revolution of the engine during cranking as the MS3 figures out where the crankshaft is. Once it sees the missing tooth on the crank trigger wheel it's good to go. However, subsequent sync losses at 3906ms, 15505ms, 20260ms, 26453ms all look exactly the same. The cam and crank signals patterns appear to be fine though, so it's a mystery to me. Could it simply be an excessively rich mixture causing misfire? Or could there be something else going on?

    See DNMakinson's Seemingly random Sync loss thread. His setup was similar to mine and his "cure" was to ditch the MS Labs WBO2 CAN Module and just use the analog output from the Innovate LC-2. I don't think I'd be happy with that solution but I might give that a try.

  17. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to freedomgli For This Useful Post:

    Greasemonkey2000 (04-06-2017),HarryB (04-06-2017)

  18. #145
    Idling - Listen to it purr... HopalongHopalong's Avatar
    Drives
    Brg Miata
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    25
    Thanks Given
    5
    Thanked 20 Times in 10 Posts
    Great build. Read it all last night. Very inspirational

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to HopalongHopalong For This Useful Post:

    freedomgli (04-06-2017)

  20. #146
    3,000 rpm - starting to feel the power freedomgli's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 Miata
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    976
    Thanks Given
    169
    Thanked 836 Times in 335 Posts


    Trying to troubleshoot random sync loss errors. In this video you can hear the engine stumble momentarily due to a sync loss error at 1:34 and again at 2:44. Data logs show the sync loss for reason #2 (missing tooth at wrong time). This only seems to happen when the CAN module is plugged in. When unplugged, I don't get the random sync loss errors. I also ran the high speed Composite Logger and the cam and crank signals patterns appear to be normal during the sync loss events.

    Disappointingly, Reverant has not responded to my last two email inquiries on April 5 (15 days ago) and April 13 (7 days ago) seeking troubleshooting assistance with his Wideband Oxygen Sensor CAN Module. I don't know if he forgot to set an out of office automated response, whether he's so popular now he can't keep up with the demand for product support or if he just doesn't care anymore. But I suspect he has written me off as a customer he no longer wants, which is rather unfortunate. I feel that I have always been courteous in my email communications with him and I don't feel that I've been a constant bother with noob questions. Contacting him for help has always been a last resort, like when I asked him if he could provide Alpha-N base maps because his speed density base maps were not plug-n-play for my situation (he was informed I was running ITBs and Alpha-N when the order was first placed).

    Granted, his products come with absolutely no warranty or service level agreement. But it's still disappointing given how many other people raved all over the forums about how great his product and customer service was. And it turns out I'm not the only one who has difficulty getting a response from him or felt ignored when difficulties arise. Problems are exacerbated by his unwillingness to publish detailed product documentation. The official Megasquirt manuals at http://www.msextra.com/manuals/ only get you so far when you're using proprietary hardware that is officially licensed but non-standard (Basic MS3). All that being said, his Basic MS3 is still pretty awesome and if I can get the CAN module to work in my setup, that would be pretty awesome, too. I cannot find another product that can do what it does.

    So back to the issue at hand. I have a high degree of confidence that my particular WBO2 CAN module is the culprit for my random sync loss errors. I unplugged the WBO2 CAN module and the Innovate LC-2 controller and ran open loop for 10 minutes during a cold start warm up cycle and had no random sync loss errors. I then plugged in just the LC-2 and ran the engine for another 10 minutes with no random sync loss errors. Once I plug in the WBO2 CAN module, the random sync loss errors return with a vengeance. I'm not sure what exactly is happening inside the black box or if it is a system integration issue with my particular LC-2 and/or Basic MS3. All the lights on the CAN module light up and/or blink as intended. But the sync loss issue has been persistent since I first installed the ECU and CAN module last Summer. I don't expect MS Labs to help out with a replacement unit as I purchased the item in 2014 when I first started my project. But you'd think he'd want to examine the device if for no other reason than to determine whether there is a defect or room for product improvement. Many manufacturers are continually improving their product. It appears that I have v1.0 of the CAN module and that current modules are using printed circuit board v3.0. What the difference is I don't know but I suspect it is to allow for more brands of wideband controllers.


    MS Labs Wideband Oxygen Sensor CAN Module with DB9 pigtails and MS3 DB37 pigtail


    MS Labs CAN Wideband Module PCB v1.0 Front


    MS Labs CAN Wideband Module PCB v1.0 Back


    Delphi Weather Pack Connector from Innovate LC-2 to MS3


    Zip ties for Innovate LC-2 serial out to CAN module connector


    MS Labs CAN Wideband Module DB9 to Innovate LC-2 Serial Out


    MS Labs CAN Wideband Module DB9 plug to MS3

    I've considered several options moving forward. Easiest is to simply revert back to the analog LC-2 output and just roll with it. Next might be to get an Innovate AFR gauge and compare those readings to what my MS3 sees and use a custom calibration so they match. Another option would be to buy another CAN module from Trackspeed Engineering, who are now US distributors for MS Labs. Part of me doesn't want to reward Reverant with any more $ since mine apparently doesn't work and he is not responsive to my request for product support. But others have had success with his CAN device and I would prefer to run it assuming I can get it to work properly. Sometimes you've just got to pay to play so I ordered a new CAN module (v3.0 I hope) from TSE. Hopefully it arrives by this weekend so I can keep chipping away at the tuning.
    Last edited by freedomgli; 04-20-2017 at 11:31 AM. Reason: added more photos

  21. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to freedomgli For This Useful Post:

    Greasemonkey2000 (04-20-2017),HarryB (04-20-2017),tsingson (04-20-2017)

  22. #147
    3,000 rpm - starting to feel the power freedomgli's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 Miata
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    976
    Thanks Given
    169
    Thanked 836 Times in 335 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by freedomgli View Post
    I ordered a new CAN module (v3.0 I hope) from TSE. Hopefully it arrives by this weekend so I can keep chipping away at the tuning.
    Well that was quick! My new MS Labs CAN Wideband Module with optional OBD-II port has arrived. UPS 3 Day Select all the way across the country arrived in just 2 days! Big thanks to Trackspeed Engineering for the quick order processing. I look forward to getting this wired up this weekend.

    Some observations:
    • The new hardware enclosure is anodized black instead of silver/clear.
    • The case screws are now T10 Torx instead of Phillips head.
    • There is a second serial connector for the OBD-II harness.
    • The PCB is v2.1. Obviously a completely different design to accommodate the OBD-II. No more jumper wires on the back side of the PCB.


    Sorry for the weird angle of all the photos. The lighting in my garage isn't ideal and if I stand directly overhead I cast a large shadow over the object I'm photographing.


    MS Labs CAN Wideband Module V2.1 with Optional OBD-II Connector


    MS Labs CAN Wideband Module V2.1 PCB Front


    MS Labs CAN Wideband Module V2.1 PCB Back


    MS Labs CAN Wideband Module V2.1 Optional OBD-II Connector Back

    Pin 4 - Chassis Ground
    Pin 5 - Signal Ground
    Pin 6 - CAN High
    Pin 14 - CAN Low
    Pin 16 - Power


    ODBII Master Pinout


    MS Labs CAN Wideband Module Old (top) vs New (bottom)

  23. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to freedomgli For This Useful Post:

    Agent☣Orange (05-11-2017),Greasemonkey2000 (04-23-2017),HarryB (04-21-2017)

  24. #148
    3,000 rpm - starting to feel the power freedomgli's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 Miata
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    976
    Thanks Given
    169
    Thanked 836 Times in 335 Posts
    Hooray! My random sync loss errors appear to have gone away after installing a new MS Labs CAN Wideband Module. Not sure what was wrong with the original unit but it was seemingly defective. Onward and upward! Now that problem is behind me I can get back to the iterative approach of tuning acceleration enrichment (to address crazy lean stumble on tip-in) and my main fuel table, then tweaking my after start enrichment and warm up enrichment settings. All the generic tuning advice says don't mess with AE until your VE table is dialed in. Well, that advice does not apply to ITBs! So much air rushes in at small throttle openings that you have to add AE to compensate. Some people would say just use ITB Load Mode and you won't have this problem. But I'm going to see how far I can get on Alpha-N alone before changing the algorithm.

    Some more pictures

    DE9M Serial Connector for Innovate LC-2 Serial Out Cable on the left
    CAN Hi/Lo, Switched 12V and Ground from the MS3 DB37 on the right


    DA15M Serial Connector for OBD-II Harness


    DA15F Serial Connector attached to OBD-II Harness


    OBD-II Connector

    Not pictured is how I used a square 4-pin Delphi Weather Pack connector to wire the CAN module to my MS3 DB37 connector. I previously used a flat 4-pin Weather Pack connector to wire the Innovate LC-2 controller to the MS3 DB37 connector, so by using the square 4-pin connector for the CAN module the connectors are automatically keyed to prevent accidentally swapping the connectors during service. I also wrapped the sub-harness for the CAN module and the sub-harness for the OBD-II connector with self-wrapping split braided sleeve and self-fusing silicone tape so that it's nice and tidy. The Innovate LC-2 controller and the CAN module live in the dash behind the radio blanking plate. I used velcro to secure the CAN module to the carpet under the dash so it doesn't rattle around. And I left the OBD-II harness disconnected but neatly wrapped up inside the dash alongside the CAN module so that it's there when I need it. Hopefully down the road when I need it I remember that I did that and don't spend hours searching my garage in vain for it!

  25. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to freedomgli For This Useful Post:

    Agent☣Orange (05-11-2017),Greasemonkey2000 (04-23-2017)

  26. #149
    3,000 rpm - starting to feel the power freedomgli's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 Miata
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    976
    Thanks Given
    169
    Thanked 836 Times in 335 Posts


    One of the main benefits to ITBs is their very small throttled volume (that is the volume between the throttle plate and the back of the intake valves), which bestows them with excellent throttle response. Another benefit is that that they have a very large throttle area, which means they can flow a lot more air, without the negative consequences of a single throttle of similar area. You see, throttles must be sized appropriately for the engine. Like the fairy tale of Goldilocks and The Three Bears, you don't want a throttle that is too big nor too small. Throttles control how much air can enter the engine and the velocity of the air that enters. Smaller throttle bodies allow the air to go faster, larger throttle bodies make the air move slower. A throttle body which is too small could limit air flow in the engine. If throttle body size is too large for a particular engine, the air will move too slowly and reduce power. It's a delicate balancing act.

    Fuel is generally not a limiting factor as it is always possible to install bigger fuel injectors and fuel pumps to meet the demand. The limiting factor is always how much air you can stuff through the engine. The more air that goes in per unit time means more power, all else being equal. The reason why forced induction makes more power is because you're compressing the air so that it is more dense.

    The stock 1.8 Miata throttle body has a diameter of ~55mm. We know that the area of a circle is pi*(r^2). Thus the stock 1.8 Miata throttle body has an area of 2,375mm^2. My TWM ITBs have four 45mm diameter throttles, one for each cylinder. Thus, the area of a single throttle is 1,590mm^2. But the total throttle area is 4 times that or 6,360mm^2. So my ITBs have >2.5x as much throttle area as the stock single throttle while being smaller, which means faster intake velocity. The stock throttle body is generally not a limiting factor until you're well over 200hp. Most people are replacing them for reliability reasons (broke throttle shaft) not flow reasons. So my throttles are probably oversized for my needs and current power output. But that could change with a built head and E85

    All that being said, my ITBs need some acceleration enrichment to handle the massive influx of air that occurs when I open the throttles. With some "Accelerator Pump" style acceleration enrichment the engine revs a lot more cleanly now when stationary / no load (see video above) but I still have a lean stumble when I open the throttles slowly vs being fine when I open them more quickly. I took the car for a drive and it quickly became apparent that I now have way too much acceleration enrichment. I was auto-tuning so now my VE table is all messed up. This is why you always save your tune before making big changes so you can go back if need be. What I need to do is back off the acceleration enrichment and add more fuel to the VE table in the cells just beyond idle. I will study the data logs and make some educated guesses on how to fix this so I don't have so much hysteresis as the AE overshoots making the mixture way too rich and then VEAL overcompensates and pulls fuel from the VE table. The acceleration enrichment settings and VE table are interdependent so it's easy to end up chasing your tail. Basic tuning advice is not to touch AE until your VE is dialed in, but it's not really possible to wait with ITBs. You kind of have to work on them both at the same time.



    After my last drive I put the car up on jack stands for an oil change. Learning how to tune means sometimes running way too rich and fuel washing down the cylinders and into the crankcase. Fuel doesn't lubricate as well as motor oil, so it's a good idea to change it often until the car is tuned better. I also noticed that my fresh coolant is already looking dirty with corrosion. So I'll go ahead and drain the coolant (again) and hook up the garden hose and flush the block and the radiator out real good. Junkyard motors....



    My kid is obsessed with the Miata. He keeps saying "Car" and "Inside". When I open the door for him he climbs inside and says "Close" because he wants me to close the door. Then he waves to me and crawls all over exploring. I taught him how to turn on the hazards and flip up the barn doors. He kept saying "Wow! Cool!"

  27. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to freedomgli For This Useful Post:

    Agent☣Orange (05-11-2017),Greasemonkey2000 (05-10-2017),HarryB (05-08-2017),JamieH (05-08-2017),Paul B (05-10-2017),RustRat (05-08-2017),tsingson (05-08-2017),ueru (05-10-2017)

  28. #150
    2,000 rpm - light wheelspin, no bog here! MLambert19's Avatar
    Drives
    1991 BRG SE #225 ~55K and counting...
    Location
    Western Maine
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    371
    Thanks Given
    121
    Thanked 162 Times in 90 Posts
    What trunk is that? Did you end up with a Murakami one?

Page 10 of 11 FirstFirst ... 34567891011 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •